Weaverville History

Like Asheville, Weaverville in the 1800s was home to grand hotels, such as the Dula Springs Hotel and Blackberry Lodge, where Low Country visitors could escape the heat and pestilence of Southern summers. Author O. Henry spent some of his last days here, regaining his health before returning to New York City and squandering it again. Weaverville College, later renamed Weaver College, contributed a defined element to our small town for 60 years until it closed in the ’30s. The creation of Lake Louise, gifted to the town by Louise Moore Hornaday and her husband in 1936, made Weaverville an idyllic destination in the country. A year earlier an entrepreneur by the name of Rex Howland built a trolley line that could carry hotel guests and day visitors the six miles from Asheville to Weaverville’s downtown for 35 cents, and in only 45 minutes.

Regrettably, Howland’s trolley line ceased operation little more than a decade later, but Weaverville’s reputation as a resort destination was established.

Six generations of Weaverville natives have been joined by transplants who share their town pride. Our town of 2,500 boasts several active civic groups, including those dedicated to beautification. Since 1990, the city has been named a Tree City USA every year. Today visitors come for our personal lifestyle as well as for the healthful mountain air and scenery. The grand hotels are gone, but the bed and breakfasts are thriving. The arts are blossoming as never before. Good food, good music, good shopping and a good rest are the legacy of Weaverville’s evolution.

With a tradition of hospitality, you will find a fun event and a lot to see and do whatever season you visit Weaverville. Please explore our site to see all Weaverville has to offer. You can find out a bit more about what’s happening in Weaverville, browse through our business directory, get maps and directions, or find out about some of the area’s attractions. Enjoy!